Muscadine Basics


In the Aug. 6, 2013 issue of the “Farm Press Blog,” the article “Muscadine offers flavor no man can replicate” states:

If you need another reason to munch on a muscadine, your natural desire to consume these sinfully sweet fruits is actually beneficial to your health.  As one of nature’s richest sources of polyphenolic antioxidants, muscadines have been the target of research for effectiveness against cancer.  Before you get too spit-happy with your grape, you might also want to know that muscadine skins and pulp are an excellent source of dietary fiber, essential minerals and carbohydrates.

Author says of the muscadine’s taste:

Somewhere between summer and fall, this fruit offers the best of both worlds with a flavor that no man can replicate.”

And regarding the technique for eating the grape, she says that, “After savoring the liquid, you have the option of disposing of the seeds, pulp and skin in whatever order you choose. I usually work out the seeds first (watching where I spit), chew on the pulp, and then suck the remaining juice from the flattened skin before sending it airborne.”  However, based on the research found here at MuscadineHealthResearch.com, I strongly recommend NOT spitting out the seeds, but instead consuming them, since that’s where most of the grape’s nutritional value is located! 🙂

N.C. State:  Muscadine Powder Developed for U.S. Army

http://momdelicious.wordpress.com/2013/06/01/n-c-state-muscadine-powder-developed-for-u-s-army/

North Carolina State University has gained support from the U.S. Army to create functional food ingredients from fruits and vegetables that will be used to develop healthier, more portable combat rations for soldiers.  Researchers with N.C. State’s Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI), located at the N.C. Research Campus in Kannapolis, are infusing protein powders and flours, the kinds found at health and nutrition stores, with health-promoting compounds from kale greens and muscadine grapes.

It starts with fresh produce.  Using a proprietary technology developed by N.C. State and Rutgers universities, Lila’s team of PHHI researchers extract healthy compounds from muscadine grapes, like anthocyanins, the pigments that give produce its blue, purple or red color and combat chronic diseases and cancer, as well as compounds from kale, like glucosinolates that provide cancer-fighting properties.


http://plantsforhumanhealth.ncsu.edu/2013/05/27/n-c-state-researchers-create-fruit-vegetable-infused-ingredients-for-u-s-army-rations/

N.C. State Researchers Create Fruit, Vegetable-infused Ingredients for U.S. Army Rations
Posted on May 27, 2013

North Carolina State University has gained support from the U.S. Army to create functional food ingredients from fruits and vegetables that will be used to develop healthier, more portable combat rations for soldiers.  Researchers with N.C. State’s Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI), located at the N.C. Research Campus in Kannapolis, are infusing protein powders and flours, the kinds found at health and nutrition stores, with health-promoting compounds from kale greens and muscadine grapes.”

The research addresses a critical military challenge:  how to provide balanced diets (inclusive of fruits and vegetables) to troops in the field that will have taste appeal while still maintaining shelf life, portability and health-protective functionality. The answer, PHHI researchers believe, lies within a proprietary technology they’re using to develop nutrient-enhanced food ingredients, which can then be used to make drinks, power bars, cookies and other healthy snacks for soldiers.”


The article describes the “strong relationship between strenuous physical activity and mental stress – common experiences for many military soldiers – and inflammation and negative immune system responses, which in turn can increase the risk of injury and poor mental and physical performance,” and explains that “Combat rations … supplemented with natural, safe and effective fruit and vegetable compounds may counteract some of those negative health impacts and reduce the risk of experiencing them, according to Dr. Mary Ann Lila, PHHI director and project research coordinator.”

Later in the article, Dr. Lila says that, “Natural compounds found in fruits and vegetables can help increase physical and cognitive capacity, improve immune function and inhibit chronic disease development in soldiers.”

The PHHI focus is on extracting “healthy compounds from muscadine grapes, like anthocyanins, the pigments that give produce its blue, purple or red color and combat chronic diseases and cancer, as well as compounds from kale, like glucosinolates that provide cancer-fighting properties.”

About the Plants for Human Health Institute
The N.C. State University Plants for Human Health Institute is leading the discovery and delivery of innovative plant-based solutions to advance human health. N.C. Cooperative Extension serves as the outreach component of the institute, which is part of the N.C. Research Campus in Kannapolis. The campus is a public-private venture including eight universities, one community college, the David H. Murdock Research Institute (DHMRI) and corporate entities that collaborate to advance the fields of human health, nutrition and agriculture.


These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
Any products or substances mentioned here are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


“MUSCADINE MEDICINE” BOOK
Muscadine Medicine,” a book by Diane Hartle, Ph.D., Phillip Greenspan, Ph.D., and James Hargrove, Ph.D., was published in 2005.

“… by 2004, there were hundreds of scientific papers in the literature. There is no sign that the research is slowing down.” (Page 7)

This book describes areas it helps:

  • Chapter 4: Heart Disease
  • Chapter 5: Diabetes
  • Chapter 6: Cancer
  • Chapter 7: Inflammation, Arthritis
  • Chapter 8: Gastrointestinal
  • Chapter 9: Longevity

“Powdered [nutraceutical supplements] … yield two benefits:

  1. “First, the shelf life is long relative to fresh fruit.
  2. “Second, phytochemicals in the products are much more concentrated in the medicinal phytochemicals than in the whole fruit.” (Page 5)

Translation: we get more nutrition from supplements than food.


UNIV. OF FLORIDA: MUSCADINE ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY
See the most recent research on the antioxidant levels found in muscadine grapes: “Antioxidant Capacity, Phenolic Content, and Profiling of Phenolic Compounds in the Seeds, Skin, and Pulp of Muscadine Grapes,” (PDF) published in Mar. 2010 in The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, from a study conducted at The University of Florida Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

  • “A total of 88 phenolic compounds of diverse structures were tentatively identified in muscadines, which included 17 in the pulp, 28 in the skin, and 43 in the seeds. Seventeen compounds were identified for the first time in muscadine grapes.”
  • “Phenolic compounds have been linked to many positive health benefits, including protective effects against certain diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The protective effect of phenolic compounds has been attributed in part to their antioxidant capacity.”

UNIV. OF ARKANSAS: MUSCADINE GRAPE PROGRAM
To learn even more about muscadine grapes, see the University of Arkansas, Division of Agriculture, Muscadine Grapes Program, apparently last updated in 2008:

  • “The University of Arkansas Enology and Viticulture Research Program is a multidisciplinary, industry-oriented program that addresses research and extension issues in grape cultivar development, production, handling, harvesting, processing, and utilization. The Program was established to conduct basic and applied research pertinent to both the current and long-term challenges that face the Arkansas, regional and national grape industries.”

UNIV. OF GEORGIA: MUSCADINE POMACE PRODUCTION TECH
For a thorough understanding of the processing of muscadine grape seeds and skins, read “Evaluation Of Drying Technologies For Muscadine Pomace To Produce An Antioxidant Rich Fuctional Food Ingredient,” (PDF) published in May 2009 at The University of Georgia.


UNIV. OF ARKANSAS: MUSCADINE PRODUCTION PROFITS
UA Grape and Wine Research Program to enhance the profitability from muscadine grape harvesting: “The Muscadine Experience: Adding Value to Enhance Profits,” (PDF) published in Sep. 2004 at The University of Arkansas.


For even more information on muscadine grapes, go to http://muscadinenews.com.


These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
Any products or substances mentioned here are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.